Roasted Purple Sprouting Broccoli

purple broccoli with cat

Everyone loves purple sprouting broccoli!

Easy to make and crispy-delicious, this recipe is a winner for a quick side-dish or snack. But watch out, you might want to eat the whole pan in one sitting!

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 30 minutes

2 bunches purple sprouting broccoli
Olive oil
Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Toss whole broccoli liberally with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Arrange in a single layer on a baking dish, pop in oven, and let sizzle for about 20 minutes. Give then a quick turn and roast for another 4-10 minutes until crispy and tender. These are best served hot out of the oven, so dig in!

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About Nash’s Root Medley

Root medley

Explore the rainbow of Nash’s root medley: carrots, beets, parsnips, rutabagas, sunchokes and potatoes might find their way into your bag!

Root vegetables each offer their unique nutrition profiles, but all of them are packed with nutritional benefits because of the extended time they spend in the rich, prime, alluvial soils of the Dungeness Valley. The more nutrient-rich the soil they are grown in, the more nutrient-packed these powerhouses will be.

The root medley is a great way to have an easy, colorful, and nourishing vegetable option for your winter dinner. Wrap roots loosely in a plastic bag and they will last for a few weeks in your fridge. However, potatoes are best stored in a cool, dry, and dark place.

According to food energetics, root vegetables provide a grounding and relaxed energy. Another huge plus: no need to peel these root vegetables, because most of the nutrients are held near the skin. Just use a brush to scrub them clean.

Here’s our favorite way to enjoy all those wonderful flavors:

Roasted Root Veggies

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Slice beets, potatoes, rutabagas, and sunchokes to half-inch cubes and slice the carrots and parsnips to half-inch rounds.

Place all vegetables into a casserole dish and drizzle with olive oil or melted butter. (You may need a second dish. You want your vegetables to be all in one layer to cook evenly.) Sprinkle with any herbs or spices of your choosing and mix to ensure oil or butter covers all roots. Cover your dish with with a lid or tin foil if you desire vegetables that will be more moist and tender. Leave your dish uncovered if you like crisp veggies.

Roast until fork tender, about 40-50 minutes.

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Roasted Heritage Turkey

Cartoon turkey

Have you experienced the flavor and texture of a pasture-raised heritage turkey yet? Let us know if you have a favorite breed in the comments below!

About Heritage Turkeys
Before supermarkets and distributors made the Broad-Breasted White turkey the dominant bird on the market and the turkey most Americans are familiar with, diverse breeds such as the Narragansetts and Jersey Buffs offered families a turkey with greater flavor and texture. Now such turkeys, known as heritage breeds or “standard” turkeys, are making a move to be on your table this Thanksgiving.

Prized for their rich flavor and beautiful plumage, heritage turkeys are the ancestors of the common Broad-Breasted White industrial breed of turkey that comprises 99.99% of the supermarket turkeys sold today. But the heritage breeds still exist and are making a comeback. Most breeds of heritage turkey were developed in the United States and Europe over hundreds of years, and were identified in the American Poultry Association’s turkey Standard of Perfection of 1874. These breeds include the Standard Bronze, Bourbon Red, Jersey Buff, Slate, Black Spanish, Narragansett and White Holland.
With rich-tasting meat that is more moist and flavorful than the mass produced large-breasted turkeys of today, heritage breeds owe their taste to diverse diets and extended life-spans. Dining on fresh grass and insects, these birds exercise and even help control farmers’ pest problems. And while large corporations, which value high breast meat production in a short period, have dominated turkey production and breeding since the 1960s, heritage breeds have been quietly gaining a renewed respect and increased market share due to their flavor and superior biological diversity.

Raising heritage breeds is more costly and time consuming than raising White-Breasted Toms. While supermarket turkeys grow to an average of 32 pounds over 18 weeks, Heritage birds take anywhere from 24-30 weeks to reach their market weight. But those who have tasted Heritage Breeds say the cost, and the wait, are well worth it.
The two breeds that have been raised at Nash’s Organic Produce are and Bourbon Red, with Narragansett making up most of the flock.

Roasted Heritage Turkey
Because your heritage turkey was raised the old-fashioned way—with plenty of grass, insects and sunshine—it needs to be cooked quite differently than the modern, factory-farmed counterpart. This tried and true recipe will make the best of your heritage bird this year.

7-9 pound fresh heritage turkey at room temperature
Kosher or sea salt & fresh ground pepper
3 cups giblet broth (see below)
Rosemary maple butter (see recipe below)
Oiled parchment paper (found at kitchen stores)

Rub turkey inside and out with salt and pepper.

Loosen the skin around the breast with your fingers and insert rosemary maple butter between the meat and the skin as well as on the inside of the bird’s cavity.

Set bird in deep roasting pan. Use a wire rack to lift the bird off the bottom of the pan.

Add the giblet broth to the bottom of the pan. Using a sheet of oiled parchment paper, tent the roasting pan with the oiled parchment paper. Any type of cooking oil can be used. Brush it on both sides with a pastry brush. The parchment paper is easily affixed to the roasting pan with a strip of foil on each end or you can use clean, oiled wooden clothespins. Remove parchment paper and the last 30 minutes of cooking to develop a crispy, golden skin.

Preheat oven to 425-450 F. Roast the bird until the thigh temperature reaches 140-150 F. Let the bird rest 10-15 minutes before carving to let the juices settle.

A word about basting
Quick roasting at high temperatures means the oven temperature needs to be maintained and frequent basting defeats that purpose. By adding butter under the skin, the bird is self-basted. Baste the bird when you remove the parchment tent. If there is not enough liquid for basting, add either more water or wine.

Giblet Broth
2 cups white wine (a deep, oaky chardonnay lends a wonderful taste)
2 cups water
Giblets & neck
Bay leaf

Simmer everything in a small saucepan for 15 minutes. Discard bay leaf and neck. Giblets can be discarded if they aren’t your type of thing or they can be finely chopped and added to the broth.

Rosemary Maple Butter
1/2 pound butter
1/2 cup pure maple syrup
1 tablespoon fresh minced rosemary
Bring butter to room temperature and whip all ingredients together.

We thank Sandra Kay Miller for this recipe.

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Easy Street Beets

golden beets, chioggia beets, and red beets bunched with greens

Beets can’t be easier than Easy Street Beets.

Remove beets from greens, leaving 1″ of stems. Wash beets under cool running water, then steam until easily pierced with a fork (20-35 minutes, depending on size). Rinse under cool water once done, and slip off skins. While the roots are steaming, wash the greens and saute them with a little olive oil until stems are tender. Slice beets and toss with balsamic vinaigrette and crumbled feta, and serve over warm beet greens.

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Roasted Root Vegetables

root medley - parsnips, carrots, beets, potatoes, turnips, rutabagas

A melange of tasty and nutrient-rich roots!

About Nash’s Root Medley
Root vegetables each offer their unique nutrition profiles, but all of them are packed with nutritional benefits because of the extended time they spend in the ground. The more nutrient-rich the soil they are grown in, the more nutrient-packed these power houses will be, and you can’t beat the Sequim-Dungeness Valley for nutrient-rich soils!

A root medley is a great way to have an easy, colorful, and nourishing vegetable option for your winter dinner. Wrap roots loosely in a plastic bag and they will last for a few weeks in your fridge. Potatoes are best stored in a cool, dry, and dark place. According to food energetics, root vegetables provide a grounding and relaxed energy. Give them all a try and see how they make you feel! Another huge plus: no need to peel these root veggies as most of the nutrients are near the skin. Just scrub with a brush. You can find five-pound bags of Nash’s organic root medley at our Nash’s Farm Store.

Roasted Root Veggies
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Slice beets, potatoes, rutabagas, and sunchokes to 1/2-inch cubes and slice the carrots and parsnips to 1/2-inch rounds.

Place all vegetables into a casserole dish and drizzle with olive oil or melted butter (You may need a second dish so that your vegetables are all in one layer to cook evenly). Sprinkle with any herbs or spices of your choosing and mix to ensure oil or butter covers all the roots. Cover your dish with with a lid or tin foil if you desire vegetables that will be more moist and tender. Leave your dish uncovered if you desire more crisp veggies. Roast until fork-tender, about 40-50 minutes.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Easy Peasey Roasted Sunchokes

sunchokes handful

Consider a handful of sunchokes for a tasty, nutritious dinner.

1 pound sunchokes
1 tablespoon olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Rinse the sunchokes under cold water, scrubbing lightly to remove any dirt. Cut into quarters and place onto a baking sheet. Don’t over-crowd them though, they need their space.

Drizzle the sunchokes with olive oil and sprinkle generously with salt and pepper. Cook for 35-45 minutes, stirring once or twice.

Add your own flair to this recipe with herbs and spices. Might I suggest garlic (stir in for the last 20 minutes of baking), paprika, rosemary, thyme? Or, sprinkle the dish with fresh herbs (dill, parsley, cilantro) after baking, or parmesan cheese. The options are limitless. Enjoy!

Recipe adapted from Tablespoon.

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Sugar Pie Pumpkins

sugar pie pumpkinsSugar pie pumpkins can be roasted in the oven, and the cooked flesh used in cookies, muffins, pies or biscuits.  One easy winter squash or pumpkin roasting technique is to just wash the squash thoroughly, knock off the stem (or not!), and stick the whole thing in the oven.  Putting it on a roasting dish or pan is a good idea too, as juices can escape while it’s cooking.  Depending on its size, the entire pumpkin  will cook in about an hour; you’ll know it’s done when its easily pierced with a fork.

Remove the cooked squash, halve it, and when cooled, remove the seeds and mash by hand or transfer to a blender or food processor to make a puree.  The skins are edible, so be sure to blend those up too!  Pumpkin puree also freezes well.

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Roasted Savoy Cabbage

Savoy cabbage

Savoy is the most beautiful cabbage of them all — and downright tasty, too.

1 head savoy cabbage
1/4 – 1/3 cup olive oil
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Lemon juice to taste
Dash cayenne or chili flakes (optional)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F and grease a rimmed baking sheet. Cut the cabbage into quarters vertically and carve out the core. Cut each quarter in two lenghthwise and thinly slice.

Place the cabbage in a large bowl, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, and toss to coat evenly. Insert in the oven and bake for 15 minutes, stirring halfway through, until cooked thoroughly and golden brown in places. Be very careful not to burn it.

Remove from oven, sprinkle with black pepper, dress with a touch of lemon juice, and serve. Like a little kick? Sprinkle with a tiny bit of cayenne or chili flakes.

Based on a recipe from ChocolateAndZucchini.com.

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Parsley–Mint–Cherry Tomato Salad

flat-leaf parsley and Italian parsley

This parsley wants to join you for dinner.

Serves 6

1 large bunch flat-leaf parsley
1 large bunch mint
1 quart cherry tomatoes
1 small shallot, finely chopped
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Pick the leaves from the parsley and mint and place in a large bowl. Halve the cherry tomatoes and toss with the parsley and mint leaves.

Combine the shallot, mustard, vinegar, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper in a small bowl and let stand 5 minutes. Whisk in the oil until emulsified, then toss the dressing with the salad and season with salt and pepper to taste.

We thank Takepart.com for this tasty recipe.

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