Summer Grain Salad

This recipe calls for Nash’s triticale berries (above), but actually any of our organic whole grain berries, i.e., soft white or hard red wheat, rye, or hard white, would work. The cooking instructions are the same. The grains add a delightful chewy texture and protein to a salad that is already teeming with good stuff for your health.

All ingredients are optional, and quantities are suggestions, not rules. Feel free to add other ingredients, like cauliflower or spinach. For even more flavor, add herbs like parsley, basil or dill. The quantities can easily be increased for summertime parties.

Veggies
1/2 pound triticale berries or other wheat berries
1/2 pint cherry tomatoes or regular-sized heirloom tomatoes, chopped
1 cucumber, chopped
1/2 bunch of your favorite kale, coarsely chopped
1 head broccoli, chopped
1/2 Walla Walla sweet onion (or sweet red onion)
2 carrots, shredded
1 beet (any variety), shredded

Dressing
1/3 cup olive oil
1/3 cup white wine vinegar
Juice of 1 lemon
2 clovers garlic, chopped

Soak the triticale berries overnight. The next day, drain the triticale berries, then add enough fresh water to cover them with about 1″ of water. Boil about 1 hour until berries are plump and chewy. Drain and cool.

In the meantime, chop your veggies. Once the triticale berries cool, mix the dressing ingredients together and pour over the berries, then add your veggies and mix everything together.

Let the flavors mingle for a few hours in the fridge before serving.

Thanks, Rachel Covault, packing shed manager, for this great recipe idea!

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Lemony Broccoli Salad

Broccoli plant

Broccoli and other members of the brassica family of vegetables are rich in phytochemicals called isothiocyanates. These magical chemicals actually communicate to your DNA to start detoxification processes!”

1 large head of broccoli (1 1/2 pounds), cut into 1-inch florets, stems peeled and sliced 1/2-inch thick
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon. finely grated lemon zest
1 small shallot, minced
Kosher salt
Freshly ground pepper

Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil. Add the broccoli florets and stems and cook until bright green and just tender, about 5 minutes. Drain and rinse the broccoli under cold water until cool; pat dry.

In a large bowl, whisk the olive oil with the vinegar, lemon juice, lemon zest and shallot and season with salt and pepper. Add the broccoli, toss to coat and serve.

The cooked and chilled broccoli can be refrigerated overnight. Toss the broccoli with the dressing just before serving.

We thank foodandwine.com for this recipe.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Shepherd’s Pie

Greek shepherd with sheep

These sheep are flocking to your kitchen, hoping for a piece of your shepherd’s pie!

This version of shepherd’s pie is quite reminiscent of the dish from Britain with a few small tweaks to make use of all the gorgeous produce we have as we move into spring.

1 tablespoon high heat oil
2 leeks, peeled and chopped
1 large carrot, chopped
1 pound ground beef or Nash’s ground pork
2 cloves garlic, diced
1 cup beef or chicken broth
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 teaspoon chopped rosemary
1 tablespoon chopped Italian parsley
1 cup diced broccoli, broccolini, or Nash’s purple broccoli
2 pounds Nash’s huckleberry gold potatoes, cut into chunks
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/2 cup milk (any fat content — I prefer full fat, you can also sub yogurt here)
Kosher salt to taste

Preheat oven to 375°F. In a large sauté pan over medium-high heat, heat the oil, then add the leek, carrot, and meat. Cook until browned, 8 to 10 minutes. Throw the diced garlic and broccoli in after 5 minutes. Drain the fat and add the broth, tomato paste, and herbs. Simmer until the juices thicken, about 10 minutes. Pour the mixture into a 1 1/2-quart baking dish; set aside.

Meanwhile, bring the potatoes to a boil in salted water. Cook until tender, about 20 minutes; drain. Mash the potatoes with the butter, milk (or yogurt) and salt. Spread them over the meat mixture, then crosshatch the top with a fork. Bake until golden, 30 to 35 minutes.

Recipe adapted from epicurious.com.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Stir-Fry Pork with Cabbage and other Super-Vegetables

Superman

Super-vegetables will keep you strong and smart!

4 boneless pork chops
2 cups broccoli florets, blanched
2 stalks celery, thinly sliced
1 large onion, thinly sliced
2 sweet red peppers, seeded, cut bite-sized
1 head bok choy, thinly sliced
2 cups fresh bean sprouts, rinsed
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1 slice fresh ginger, minced
1 cup beef broth
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon sesame oil
2 teaspoon oyster sauce
1/4 teaspoon hot red pepper sauce (optional)
1 1/2 tablespoon cornstarch
1/3 cup cold water

Remove fat from pork and cut into thin slices. Have veggies cut and ready. Prepare the sauce by heating 1 tablespoon of oil in a small saucepan. Sauté the garlic and ginger until sizzling. Add broth, soy sauce, brown sugar, sesame oil, oyster sauce, and hot red pepper sauce. Simmer 5 minutes. Stir the cornstarch into cold water until there are no lumps. Add to sauce, stirring constantly until thickened. Simmer a few minutes longer.

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a 12-inch skillet or wok. Over high heat, stir-fry the pork until it’s just cooked through. Remove and reserve the pork. Add another tablespoon oil to the skillet. Over medium-high heat, stir-fry the celery and onion 1 minute. Add the red pepper and broccoli; stir-fry 1 minute. Add the cabbage; stir-fry 1 minute. Add the sprouts and cooked pork. Stir in the sauce and heat through, stirring well to blend flavors.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Quick and Easy Broccoli Salad with Feta and Olives

Broccoli plant

This recipe calls for steaming, which is a cooking method that enhances broccoli’s cholesterol lowering potential. Do a quick steam, so your broccoli remains crisp and bright green. Enjoy!

2 pounds broccoli
6 tablespoons crumbled feta cheese
12 kalamata olives, sliced or chopped
6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
4 teaspoons lemon juice
4 medium cloves garlic
Sea salt and pepper to taste

Optional:
1 red onion, sliced, added to steamer with broccoli stems or 2 minutes before florets
10 drops soy sauce
4 tablespoons sunflower seeds

Fill the bottom of a steamer with 2 inches of water.

While steam is building up in steamer, cut broccoli florets into quarters. Peel stems and cut into 1/4-inch pieces. Let florets and stems sit for 5 minutes to bring out their health benefits.

Chop or press garlic and let sit for at least 5 minutes. Steam stems for 2 minutes before adding the florets. Transfer to a bowl. For more flavor, toss broccoli with the remaining ingredients and any of the optional ingredients while it is still hot.

This recipe was adapted from WHFoods.com.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Vegetarian Pho

baby green bok choy

Is your CSA box rich with bok choy? Try this Vietnamese noodle soup (pho) for a tasty way to enjoy your veggies.

Serves 2

For the broth
1 large onion, peeled and halved
2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and halved lengthwise
3-inch cinnamon stick, preferably Vietnamese cassia-cinnamon
1 star anise
2 whole cloves
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
4 cups unsalted vegetable stock or broth
2 teaspoons soy sauce
4 carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped

For the noodles
1/2 pound dried flat rice noodles (known as bánh phở; use 1/16″, 1/8″, or 1/4″ width depending on availability and preference)

For the toppings (choose a few)
Protein such as fried or baked tofu, bean curd skin, or seitan
Mushrooms
Vegetables such as bok choy, napa cabbage, or broccoli

For the garnishes (choose a few)
1/2 large onion, very thinly sliced
2 scallions, thinly sliced
1 chile pepper (Thai bird, serrano or jalapeño), sliced
1 lime, cut into wedges
1/2 cup bean sprouts
Large handful of herbs: cilantro, Thai basil
Hoisin sauce, Sriracha (optional)

To make the broth, char the onion and ginger over an open flame (holding with tongs) or directly under a broiler until slightly blackened, about 5 minutes on each side. Rinse with water.

In a large pot, dry-roast cinnamon, star anise, cloves, and coriander over medium-low heat, stirring to prevent burning. When you can smell the aroma of the roasted spices, add vegetable stock, soy sauce, carrots, and charred onion and ginger.

Bring broth to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. Strain and keep hot until ready to serve.

Make the noodles while the broth simmers. Place the noodles in a large bowl and cover with hot water. Let stand for 20 to 30 minutes or until tender but still chewy. Drain. (If soaking does not soften the noodles enough, blanch them in a pot of boiling water for a few seconds.)

Prepare the toppings as desired – slice and cook tofu, lightly steam or blanch vegetables, and so on. Toppings should be unseasoned or only lightly seasoned so as not to interfere with the flavor of the broth.

To serve, divide the noodles between two bowls. Arrange toppings over noodles. Ladle the broth between the two bowls. Serve with garnishes on the side, which diners should add to taste.

We thank The Kitchn for this tasty recipe.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Kia’s Toasted Cumin Broccoli Salad

Broccoli plantPan-toasted cumin and fresh broccoli steal the show in this easy summer salad.

4-5 medium heads broccoli
1 cup mayo and/or Greek yogurt
2 limes, juiced
1 clove garlic, minced or finely grated
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon Bragg’s Liquid Aminos or tamari soy sauce
1 teaspoons ground toasted cumin seeds (see below) or cumin powder or
chili powder
Fresh cracked pepper to taste
Pickled hot peppers, minced (optional)

Pan-toast the cumin seeds by putting several heaping tablespoons of whole cumin seeds in dry skillet on medium-low heat. Stir or flip the seeds carefully, off and on, for about 5-7 minutes, until they start to show a little sign of color, and are getting really aromatic. Don’t let them smoke or burn! Remove toasted seeds from pan and let cool completely before grinding them in a spice grinder. Coffee grinders reserved for processing herbs and spices work well for this type of job. I found a used one that I keep around just for spices, so I don’t adulterate my precious coffee beans! (You’ll have more ground cumin than you need for this one recipe, and it will remain freshest if you store it in a little jar in the fridge. Toasted cumin is fabulous in scrambled eggs, rice, beans, chili, etc.)

Prepare the dressing for the salad by whisking together the mayo/yogurt, lime juice, garlic, vinegar, salty liquid aminos/soy sauce, ground cumin, fresh cracked pepper and optional pickled hot peppers. Set aside and let the flavors meld while you prep the broccoli.

Mince or shred the broccoli, stems and all! This is a great job for a food processor if you have one with a shredding attachment. Peel the broccoli stems prior to shredding if needed.

Thoroughly toss dressing with shredded broccoli and taste and season with more salt and pepper as needed. This salad can be eaten immediately or left to marinade for a few hours or even a day before you dig in.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Roasted Beet Salsa with Skillet-Browned Broccoli

Broccoli plant

Beet salsa with broccoli? Oh yes please!

Roasted Beets
4 medium golden beets
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper
2 teaspoons shallots, finely diced
2 teaspoons fresh ginger, grated
1 teaspoon jalapeño, finely diced
1/2 teaspoon garlic, minced
1/4 cup fresh mint, minced
1/4 cup fresh cilantro, minced
2 teaspoons lime juice

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Trim the tops off the beets and drizzle with the olive oil. Season the beets with salt and pepper, wrap them in aluminum foil and roast until tender, about 40-50 minutes. Let cool in the foil.

While the beets are roasting, place the shallot, jalapeno, ginger, garlic, mint, cilantro, lime juice and 6 tablespoons of olive oil in a small bowl and stir to combine.

When the beets are done, carefully remove the foil. Peel them by slipping the skins off with your fingers. Dice the beets and add salsa mixture, stirring to combine. Taste for seasoning. Served on a bed of arugula or spinach.

Browned Broccoli
2 tablespoons oil
2 large stems broccoli
1 large cauliflower
2 to 3 cloves garlic

Heat a skillet over medium heat. While it’s heating, slice the garlic, broccoli and cauliflower from top to bottom into 1 inch slices. Toss in olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place the veggies in a hot skillet, pressing them into the pan with a spatula. Cook them for 5 to 7 minutes, or until nicely browned. Once cooked, serve with shredded carrots or radishes.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Vegetable Tempura

The Carrot over the Stick

Raw veggies are absolutely lovely, but sometimes it’s fun to mix it up with tempura for a special occasion.

Serves four to six as an appetizer.

Dipping Sauce
2 scallions, minced
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup water
2 teaspoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon grated ginger root
2 minced garlic cloves
1 teaspoon dry mustard

Batter
2 cups all purpose flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
2 cups cold water
1/4 cup dark sesame oil

Veggies
5 cups seasonal fresh veggies, such as broccoli, zucchini, carrots, sweet potatoes, mushrooms, etc.

For the dipping sauce, combine the scallions, soy sauce, water, vinegar, honey, ginger, garlic, and mustard in a bowl. Cover and refrigerate for an hour to let the flavors blend.

For the batter, mix together the flour and baking powder. Add the cold water and sesame oil all at once and whisk until the consistency of pancake batter and very smooth. Refrigerate until ready to prepare the tempura.

Blot the vegetables dry, season with salt and pepper and dip into the batter. Coat them evenly.

Pour the oil into a tall pot to a depth of 3 inches. Heat over medium heat until around 350 degrees F. Work in batches to avoid crowding. Slip the batter-coated vegetables into the hot oil, deep-frying until the batter is a golden brown and puffy, 3-4 minutes. Turn the veggies so they cook evenly. Remove from the pot with tongs. Drain on an absorbent towel. Serve with dipping sauce.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Six Nettle Recipes

nettles

Young nettles are easily blanched and frozen to enjoy year round. They are easy to dry as well for healthy herbal teas.

Farmer’s Nettle Frittata
Saute red onions, mushrooms in season, grated carrot, finely sliced broccoli spears and minced chickweed together in olive oil until wilted. Add a handful of minced young nettle stalk and leaves on top, cover and let steam until nettles wilt. Meanwhile, prepare a mixture of eggs, minced parsley and dried basil. Stir well and pour it over the steaming veggies. Place a cover on the pan, wait until eggs set, then flip until done. Delicious as is or with salsa or chickweed pesto.

Leek, Chickweed and Nettle Soup
Saute chopped leeks, celery and crushed garlic cloves in olive oil until soft; add diced potatoes (I use russets or Yukon golds). Add minced chickweed, nettles, parsley, dried basil, turmeric, salt and perhaps a bit more oil or butter. Saute a few minutes more, mixing all the ingredients well to blend the flavors. Cover with stock or water and simmer until everything is tender. Other veggies can be added, such as tomatoes, grated carrots, or perhaps a tin of salmon added at the end for even more variety. Unlike most leek and potato soup recipes, I do not use milk or cream as an ingredient, nor do I find a need to puree if the ingredients are diced small enough, as everything seems to meld together just fine.

Nettle Lasagna
Any spinach lasagna recipe will do for nettle lasagna with the obvious substitution of sauteed or steamed young nettles. If you make your own noodles, toss a spoonful of dried nettle powder into your flour mixture for added nutrition or into your homemade tomato sauce.

Nettle Quiche
Again, there are countless recipes for making quiches. My favorite is from The Enchanted Broccoli Forest by Mollie Katzen. Since I make my own crusts, sometimes I’ll throw in a tablespoon of dried nettle powder with my flours. For the filling, I use a large handful of chopped and steamed nettles, along with sauteed onions, mushrooms in season, chopped broccoli, and an assortment of fresh and dried herbs laid on a bed of feta and shredded raw cheddar cheeses. Over that goes an egg-and-milk mixture to which I might mix in an additional tablespoon of flour depending on how moist my ingredients are.

Nettle Greens Medley
Saute slivers of red onion and garlic in olive oil or coconut oil until translucent. Add equal amounts of chopped Swiss chard and nettle tops. Pour in a small quantity of water, cover with lid and steam until wilted and tender. Mix gently to blend the veggies and oil, sprinkle on some sea salt and serve.

Sesanelp
A seasoning mixture of sesame seeds, nettle seed and nettle herb plus kelp and Celtic salt. Tasty! Roast 1/2 cup sesame seed in a frying pan to your liking. Cool. To a blender add cooled sesame seeds, 2/3 cup of nettle seed, 2 tablespoons dried nettle herb, 2 tablespoons kelp granules and 1/2 teaspoon Celtic salt. Blend till fine. Store in a glass jar. Goes great with a wide variety of foods. My morning toast is sprouted grain bread with a dribble of olive oil topped with this mixture and nutritional yeast. Yum!

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!