Creamy Camelina Dill Dressing

NEW at Nash’s! Eating local has never been so easy when you can get local cooking oil!

1/3 cup Greek yogurt (optional)
2 small garlic cloves
2 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
2 Tbsp. cider vinegar
1 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
1/3 cup Nash’s camelina oil
1 cup fresh chopped dill
Salt and pepper, to taste

In food processor, combine yogurt (if using), garlic, mustard, vinegar, and lime juice. Process until smooth and slowly add camelina oil to ensure emulsification.

Once all the camelina oil has been added, process for an additional minute, transfer to bowl, and fold in dill. Season with salt and pepper. If you wish to cut out yogurt for more of a vinaigrette texture, just whisk all ingredients together in bowl.

This dressing will keep for several days in fridge—just shake or whisk before use.

Makes 1 cup.

Serve drizzled over fresh greens and summer veggies, or get creative—this dressing can also be used for fish, pasta salad, slaws, potatoes, and dips.

We thank Alive.com for this recipe.

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Braised Spring Carrots and Leeks with Tarragon

Bunch carrots

They’re BACK! Bunched carrots are coming out of the greenhouse and into your tummy!

2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1 lb. leeks, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise, cleaned and sliced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 lb. carrots, peeled, halved or quartered lengthwise if thick, then cut in 2-inch lengths
½ cup water
Salt to taste
2 tsp. fresh lemon juice
1 Tbsp. chopped fresh tarragon

Heat olive oil in a medium saucepan or lidded skillet over medium heat. Add leeks and a generous pinch of salt. Cook gently until just about tender, about three minutes. Do not allow leeks to color. Add garlic, and cook, stirring, until fragrant, 30 seconds to a minute. Add carrots, water and salt to taste, and lower heat. Cover and simmer 10 to 15 minutes until carrots are tender when pierced with a knife. Stir in lemon juice and tarragon. Taste and adjust salt. Serve hot, or at room temperature. Sprinkle with additional fresh tarragon just before serving.

We thank cooking.nytimes.com for this recipe.

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Savoy Cabbage Raab and Pork

A jaunty bunch of savoy cabbage raab

Savoy cabbage raab in its full glory.

3-4 slices bacon or pork belly, cut into small pieces
4 cloves garlic, chopped
2 bunches Savoy cabbage raab, washed and ends trimmed
1 Tbsp. olive oil
1/8 tsp. cayenne (optional)
Whole grains or brown rice (optional)

Saute bacon or pork belly with garlic in a frying pan until the bacon starts to brown. Remove and set aside.

Cut raab (stalk, leaves, florets and all) into one-inch pieces. Add olive oil to the pork drippings and saute raab until it starts to wilt. Cover and let it cook for a few minutes more until tender.

Remove from heat and stir in pork and garlic. Add salt and pepper to taste and a little cayenne if you like a bit of a kick. This tastes great on a bed of brown rice or on cooked whole grain, like triticale or rye berries.

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Garlicky Spinach Salad with Pine Nuts and Raisins

Spinach in the field

It’s finally SPINACH time again! Hooray!

1 bunch Nash’s spinach, rinsed and drained
1/3 cup pine nuts
3 cloves garlic
1/2 anchovy filet (about 1/4 cup anchovy paste)
Pinch of salt, pepper, red pepper flakes
1 Tbsp. + 1 tsp. vinegar or lemon juice
1/4 cup oil
3 Tbsp. vinegar
1/3 cup raisins

In a small skillet over medium heat, toast pine nuts, shaking pan and stirring often, until they are barely golden and fragrant, about 3 minutes. Pour onto a plate to cool.

Using a mortar and pestle, mash garlic, anchovy, a pinch of salt and red pepper flakes into a paste. Transfer to a small bowl. Whisk in vinegar, then slowly whisk in oil.

Chiffonade the spinach by stacking the leaves, rolling them tightly, and slicing them perpendicular to the roll. This gives long, thin strips of spinach.

Place spinach in a large bowl; add vinaigrette until just covered and toss well to combine. Add pine nuts and raisins. Toss once more and serve. 2 to 4 servings.

Recipe adapted from nytimes.com.

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Creamy, Smoky Whipped Rutabaga

Rutabagas in a basket

Does anyone else love rutabagas even more than potatoes?

3 1/2 to 4 pounds rutabagas (two small or one large vegetable)
2 Tbsp. unsalted butter
4 garlic cloves, peeled and roughly chopped
1 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
1 cup whole milk
4 ounces cream cheese, cut into small chunks
2 Tbsp. olive oil
2 tsp. smoked paprika
Freshly ground black pepper

Using a veggie peeler, remove the skin from the rutabaga(s). Then cut them into small slices about 1 inch thick.

Heat the butter in a large, heavy 4-quart pot, set over medium heat. When the butter has melted, stir in the chopped rutabaga and the garlic. Stir to coat the vegetables in butter, then sprinkle them with the salt. Pour in the milk and bring to a simmer, then turn the heat to low and cover the pot. Cook for 30 minutes, or until the rutabaga is very tender and can be easily pierced with a fork. Turn off the heat and remove the lid. Let the vegetables cool for about 5 minutes.

At this point you can either leave the rutabaga in the pot and use a hand mixer to whip it, or you can transfer it to the bowl of a stand mixer and use the paddle.

Drop the cream cheese into the rutabaga and use the hand mixer or stand mixer to mash it into the vegetables. The rutabaga will crumble then slowly turn into a mashed potato consistency. Add the olive oil and smoked paprika and mix thoroughly. Taste and add more salt and some black pepper, if necessary. Serve immediately.

Recipe adapted from thekitchn.com.

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Root Vegetable Puree

Narizao, The Cool Brother of the Other Guy - 2017.02.17.F01

Warm up with soup!

Serves 4 to 6
Prep time: 30 minutes
Cook time: 30 minutes

4 large parsnips, peeled and chopped into 1-inch cubes (about 3 cups)
1 rutabaga, peeled and chopped into 1-inch cubes (about 2 cups)
1 potato, peeled and chopped into 1-inch cubes (about 1 cup)
3 tsp. olive oil
½ tsp. salt, or to taste
¾ cup yogurt
2 to 3 cloves garlic
Water to thin, if desired

Preheat oven to 400° F.

Place vegetables in roasting pans. Mix with olive oil and sprinkle with salt, and cover. Roast for about 30 minutes, or until vegetables are fork tender. Allow vegetables to cool.

Place in a food processor (in batches, if necessary), along with yogurt and garlic, adding water if needed. Process until smooth.

Try serving the puree under a spoonful of your favorite soup!

Original recipe by Virginia Newman.

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Bright Carrot Cumin Soup

Carrots

Winter is when warm carrot soup tastes soooooooo good!

Serves 4 to 6
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 25 minutes

6 to 7 carrots, chopped (about 4 cups)
1 Tablespoon olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
3/4 cup chopped onions
1 Tablespoon butter
1 quart vegetable broth, divided
2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon finely diced ginger
3 to 4 cloves garlic, minced
Juice from 1/2 lemon slice
1/2 cup coconut milk (optional)

Preheat oven to 400° F. Combine carrots, oil and a pinch of salt on a baking sheet. Roast for 20-25 minutes or until fork tender.

Sauté onions in butter over medium heat until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons broth, cumin, turmeric, paprika and remaining salt and allow to simmer for 1 to 2 minutes. Add remaining broth, ginger, garlic and roasted carrots. Bring to a boil, then simmer 5 minutes more. Remove from heat and allow to cool for 5 to 10 minutes. Add lemon juice and coconut milk, then blend until smooth with an immersion blender, or in batches in a stand-up blender.

We thank Virginia Newman for this recipe.

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Sunchoke Soup

sunchokes

Sunchokes are a knobby but delicious root vegetable. Not to be confused with ginger, which is a common mistake, sunchokes offer a sweet and nutty crunch to your winter menus.

2 pounds sunchokes
3 tablespoons butter
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup chopped leek (white and pale green parts only)
2 cloves garlic, chopped
7 cups (or more) vegetable broth
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
Ground white pepper
Shelled and roasted pumpkin seeds

Rinse and scrub sunchokes to remove all soil. Melt butter in heavy large pot over medium heat. Add onion, leek, and garlic; sprinkle with salt and sauté until soft and translucent, stirring often, about 12 minutes. Cut sunchokes into 1-inch pieces. Add to onion mixture and sauté 5 minutes. Add vegetable broth, increase heat to high, and bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until chokes are very tender, about 1 hour. Cool slightly.

Working in batches, puree soup in blender until very smooth. Return to pot. Rewarm soup, adding more broth by 1/4 cups, if needed, to thin. Stir in cream and season to taste with salt and white pepper.

This soup can be made 1 day ahead and refrigerated. Rewarm before serving. Divide soup among bowls and garnish with toasted pumpkin seeds; top with a drizzle of pumpkin seed oil and some sautéed mushrooms, if desired.
 
Recipe adapted from epicurious.com.

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Kori’s Lacinato Kale & Fennel

lacinato kale1 cup bow-tie pasta, cooked according to package
Olive oil
2 cups lacinato kale, rinsed and chopped into bite-size pieces
1 can (14 ounces) diced Italian-style tomatoes
2 teaspoons garlic, minced
1 fennel bulb, thinly-sliced
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
1 cup fresh shiitake mushrooms, diced
1 cup (8 ounces) thick bacon or pork belly, cubed
Grated Parmesan, for garnish

In small saucepot, boil water and cook the bow tie pasta according to package directions. Drain after cooking and set aside.

In separate saucepan, cook the bacon. Once cooked, set aside over paper towel to absorb grease until ready to add to dish.

In large saucepot, drizzle olive oil over med-high heat. Add minced garlic; sauté for about 2 minutes. Add lacinato kale and fennel; sauté about 5 minutes until softened.

Add Italian tomatoes, fresh tomatoes and shiitake mushrooms. Let simmer for about 5-10 minutes, or until everything is softened and cooked.

Add the pasta to the large saucepot to create a 50/50 mix of pasta and veggies. Drizzle olive oil.

Lastly, add the bacon. Let warm over stove for about 5-10 minutes before serving. Served with fresh Parmesan.

We thank Ocean Mist Farms for this recipe.

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Linguine with Arugula, Garlic & Parmesan

arugula

More fun facts about arugula: *Arugula’s bitter and pungent properties make it a digestive tonic. *In Ayurvedic medicine, arugula is considered an energy mover. *Arugula oil has been extracted from the seeds and is considered an aphrodisiac in Europe.

12 ounces linguine or other dried pasta
3 tablespoons olive oil or butter
7 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
2 very large handfuls (about 5 ounces) arugula
1/2 cup freshly shredded or shaved Parmesan, plus extra for topping
1/3 cup toasted pine nuts (optional)

Cook pasta al dente in a large stockpot of generously salted water according to package instructions.

While pasta is cooking, heat olive oil (or melt the butter) in a saute pan over medium-high heat. Add the sliced garlic and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until it begins to turn just slightly golden. Remove from heat. If the pasta is not yet ready, transfer the garlic to a separate dish to prevent it from overcooking.

Once the pasta is cooked, drain it. Immediately stir in the garlic and olive oil mixture, arugula, and Parmesan cheese.  Toss until combined. Serve immediately, topped with extra Parmesan cheese (and toasted pine nuts, if using).

We thank gimmesomeoven.com for this recipe.

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