Bre’s Basic Scones

Bre is one of the farm’s unofficial Makers of Snacks. She spoils us with tasty treats! In addition to occasionally baking for us, she also works on our Harvest Crew and at farmer’s markets.

Bre has picked up a few baking tips over the years. “Try to have all your ingredients the same temperature before you mix them. Get a good sifter to thoroughly mix your dry ingredients. Keep that journal, because if you make a slight change that works well, you want to remember it!”

2 cups flour (can be different kinds)
2 Tbsp. sugar
2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 cup chilled and cubed butter
3/4 cup buttermilk
1 egg, separated

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Next, prepare your floured surface for shaping the dough.

(Option if you don’t have buttermilk: Prepare “buttermilk” by combining 1 cup milk and 1 tablespoon lemon juice in a bowl. Let stand 5-10 minutes and measure 3/4 cup liquid from the bowl.)

Combine the dry ingredients in a large bowl or a food processor. Either cut in the cold butter with a pastry cutter or pulse in a food processor until a sandy texture is reached. (Larger butter chunks will lead to flakier scones)

Whisk egg yolk and buttermilk together. Then combine with dry ingredients with a wooden spoon until a dough forms. If it feels too wet or sticky add a small handful of flour and mix until just combined. Trust your instinct!

Pour dough onto a floured surface and shape into a 7 inch disc. (Optional: knead in dried fruit, chocolate chips, raisins, nuts, etc.) Then cut into 8 equal wedges.

Place on your baking sheet and brush on reserved egg white. For softer scones, place touching each other in a tight circle. Bake 25-29 minutes or until barely brown on the edges. Place the sheet on a rack to cool for 10 minutes.

Once cooled, feel free to add a powdered sugar drizzle (see below) or top with preserves.

Powdered Sugar Drizzle (Optional)
1 cup powdered sugar
2 Tbsp. water or milk
1 Tbsp. vanilla.

Combine all drizzle ingredients in a small bowl, adjusting quantities to your desired consistency or top with preserves

Bre’s Baking Tips

Breanna (Bre) Krumpe came to work for Nash’s several years ago and has become one of our most valued employees. She works with the harvest and packing crews, and is also a solid marketeer, anchoring our Seattle markets several times a month. In addition to being a talented musician, she enjoys baking and has been experimenting with different types of flour from Nash’s Farm..

She started her baking “career” while working in a corporate office in Portland.She felt that the atmosphere was too sterile and cold, so she boosted morale and built friendlier relations with her co-workers by baking something for each person’s birthday. “I’m good with spices and flavors, and I like to experiment,” Bre says. “I’ve gotten to the point where flavors are usually good, so now I’m playing with textures.”

Once on the farm, Bre realized she had access to lots of different kinds of grains and flours. She began trying the different kinds, keeping a journal of her recipes and how things turned out when she changed one flour for another. “I bake lots of scones because they are pretty easy and the taste of the flour doesn’t have to compete with other flavors, so you can really compare flavors and textures.”

  • Her favorite of Nash’s flours, so far, is the triticale. “I love the nutty flavor for cookies an brownies.”
  • Nash’s soft white wheat flour is more delicate. “It puffs up more, so my scones are more like cake.”
  • The hard red is more grainy and rustic, good for bread. “It’s so ‘alive.’ I use it for sourdough bread, and each loaf is unique.”
  • She’s just started playing with barley flour. “It makes a fluffier scone than triticale, and has an earthier flavor, but it crumbles a little. I may have to add more oil or moisture.”
  • Combining flours makes for even more interesting flavors. “Buckwheat is almost sweet, so I combine buckwheat and triticale for great taste and texture.”

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Cheesy Egg Boats

1 baguette
3 eggs
2 tablespoons whole milk
1 1/4 cups shredded cheddar cheese
2 1/2 tablespoons pickled or roasted peppers, drained and finely chopped
1 tablespoon chopped chives
1-3 pinches cayenne pepper (optional)
Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 350°F. Line baking sheet with parchment paper. Make a v-cut the length of the baguette, being careful to leave the ends intact. Remove v-shaped bread from baguette and hollow out baguette. Do not cut through bottom or sides. Place on baking sheet.

Beat eggs and milk in bowl until combined. Stir in cheese, peppers, chives, cayenne, salt and pepper. Slowly pour into baguette, spreading cheese and peppers evenly. Bake 25-35 minutes, until set, and golden brown on top. Let cool 5 minutes before cutting into 1-inch slices.

We thank PCC Natural Markets in the Seattle area for this recipe.

 

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Basic Rolled Oats

Nash's rolled oats

Nash’s naked oats – grown and rolled right here on the farm!

1 cup Nash’s rolled oats
2 cups water or milk, or a combination
Pinch of salt (optional)
Pad of butter (optional)
1 teaspoon honey, give or take (optional)
Fresh or dried fruit (optional)
Nuts, lightly crushed (optional)

Tip: Quickly remove some of the oat hulls that slipped through the roller, by swirling the oats in water and skimming off any hulls that float to the top.

Combine oats and water/milk in a pot over medium-low heat. Bring to a simmer, stirring frequently. Once the oats begin to soften and the liquid thickens, you can add a pinch of salt, plus an optional pad of butter, or a teaspoon of honey, etc. Simmer and stir until the oats reach your desired texture and consistency. You may need to cook them for about 20 minutes to soften the bran. When serving, top with chopped fresh or dried fruit and lightly crushed nuts.

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Skillet Huevos Rancheros

Eggs1/2 onion, diced
Olive oil
Bell pepper, kale, zucchini, mushrooms (optional)
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
2 cups cooked, rinsed beans (black beans, pinto, cannellini, or heirloom beans)
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon coriander
1/2 teaspoon chipotle powder
1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 tablespoons water
4 x 6-inch tortillas
4 eggs (1 per serving — you can add more if you want)
Cracked pepper

Optional:
1/2 cup crumbled cotija, queso fresco, feta or goat cheese (optional)
1 large avocado, sliced
1 lime, cut into wedges
2 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped
Hot sauce
Additional fresh diced tomatoes

Preheat oven to 400F. In a large pan over medium heat, sauté onion in a little olive oil until tender, about 5 minutes (if you are adding optional veggies, do it now, cooking until tender). Add garlic and sauté for a minute or two. Add half of the diced tomatoes (saving half for garnish) as well as the beans, spices, salt and water. Let simmer on medium low for a few minutes, stirring occasionally.

Brush large cast iron skillet with olive oil, coating the edges too. Lay tortillas down and brush tops of tortillas with oil.

Divide bean mixture, making little indentations with the back of a spoon for the eggs to rest in, so they stay in place. If using a large skillet, layer the tortillas so they come up the sides of the skillet a bit (you may need a couple extra), and spread all of the beans evenly over the tortillas, making indentations for the eggs.

Carefully break the eggs and place them in the indentations. Sprinkle eggs with salt and pepper and, if you want, crumbled cheese, and place in the hot oven.

Check after 10-12 minutes. Cook until egg whites are white and yolks are to your desired done-ness. Serve with avocado, lime, cilantro, hot sauce, and fresh tomatoes.

We thank Feastingathome.com for this recipe.

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Benedict Strata

8 slices whole-wheat bread
6 slices (4 ounces) bacon, chopped
6 farm-fresh eggs
1 1/2 cups milk
2 tablespoons mayonnaise
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 teaspoons freshly grated lemon peel

Break the bread slices into 1-inch pieces. Place half of the pieces in single layer in greased 8-inch square baking dish. Top with 1/2 of the bacon. Repeat layers with remaining bread pieces and bacon.

Beat eggs, milk, mayonnaise, lemon juice and lemon peel in large bowl until blended. Slowly pour over layers in baking dish. Refrigerate, covered, several hours or overnight.

Heat oven to 350°F. Remove strata from refrigerator; uncover and let stand while oven heats. Bake in center of 350°F oven until puffed, golden and knife inserted near center comes out clean, 50 to 60 minutes.

Variation: sprinkle 1 cup finely chopped kale between the layers, and/or 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese on top for the last 20 minutes of baking.

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Buckwheat Bliny

Buckwheat groats

Before it’s ground into flour, buckwheat looks like a pile of tiny, three-sided pyramids. After it’s ground, sifted, and baked into pancakes, buckwheat is delicious.

This traditional Russian dish highlights buckwheat’s place of origin (Siberia) and is very versatile. Add your choice of accompaniments and eat these treats for breakfast, lunch, dinner or snacks. Make a batch on Sunday and enjoy throughout the week! If you are trying to reduce the amount of gluten in your diet, use all buckwheat flour instead of the soft white wheat flour.

2/3 cups Nash’s soft white wheat flour
1/2 cup buckwheat flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon instant yeast
1 cup warm milk
2 tablespoons  butter
1 egg, separated
Vegetable oil (high heat)

Optional accompaniments
Butter
Sour cream
Crème fraîche
Caviar
Smoked fish (salmon, sturgeon, trout, whitefish)
Chopped onions
Chopped hard-boiled eggs
Fresh chopped dill
Beet salad

In a bowl, mix the first four dry ingredients together and then make a well in the center. Add the milk and blend well with a wooden spoon. Cover with a dish towel and place in a warm, draft-free area and let the sponge rise until it doubles in size, about a hour.

Melt the butter and let it cool. Break up and beat the egg yolk in a small bowl and add the cooled melted butter a teaspoon at a time (this is an important step to temper the batter) and beat well. Add this egg yolk/butter mixture to the sponge and mix well.

In a separate bowl, whisk the egg white until stiff and fold into the sponge/batter. Cover again and let stand for twenty minutes.

Heat a skillet or griddle to medium heat and coat lightly with vegetable oil. Spoon about 2 tablespoons to a quarter cup of batter on the skillet, depending on how large you want your bliny to be. When the bubbles on the surface of the batter pop (after about a minute or two) turn the bliny over with a spatula and cook for another 45 seconds to a minute. Transfer to a plate and keep warm. Serve with your preferred accompaniments.

We thank thekitchn.com for this recipe.

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An Oat Education

Nash's rolled oats

Nash’s rolled oats – grown and rolled right here on the farm!

Local up your breakfast with Nash’s farm-raised and rolled oats! More nutty and flavorful than traditional rolled oats, ours make amazing oatmeal, granola, cookies and more. A thick rolled oat, we recommend a slightly longer cooking time for breakfast cereal. Keep an eye out for hulls that sneaked through our cleaner, and scoop them off of the top of your saucepan, as they float to the top when combined with water. Because of the fiber combination found in oats, they have been shown to lower cholesterol levels time and time again in research studies. They also offer a unique antioxidant family called avenanthramides (say that ten times fast!) that has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Nash’s oats are a bit different than what you find on the average grocery shelves, as they’re the least processed of the bunch, leaving a whole grain product just as nature intended. Because of the minimal processing, our oats will store in an air-tight container in a dimly lit space for months.

Whole Grain Naked Oats

These are oat “groats,” which we put through our roller mill to make rolled oats.

An Oat Education

Oat groats—unflattened kernels that are good for using as a breakfast cereal or for stuffing.

Steel-cut oats—have a dense and chewy texture, and are produced by running the grain through steel blades that thinly slice them.

Old-fashioned oats—have a flatter shape that is the result of their being steamed and then rolled.

Quick-cooking oats—processed like old-fashioned oats, except they are cut finely before rolling.

Instant oatmeal—produced by partially cooking the grains and then rolling them very thin. Oftentimes, sugar, salt and other ingredients are added to the finished product.

Oat bran—the outer layer of the grain that resides under the hull. While oat bran is found in rolled oats and steel-cut oats, it may also be purchased as a separate product that can be added to recipes or cooked to make a hot cereal.

Oat flour—used in baking, it is oftentimes combined with wheat or other gluten-containing flours when making leavened bread.

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Breakfast Oats

Nash's rolled oats

Nash’s naked oats – grown and rolled right here on the farm!

1 cup cooked Nash’s rolled oats
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons raisins
2 tablespoons sliced pecans
2 tablespoons dried apricots, chopped
2 tablespoons sunflower or pumpkin seeds
1 date, chopped
1 tablespoon dried cranberries

Mix all ingredients together and top with a dollop of your favorite yogurt.

Recipe inspiration from WHFoods.com.

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Chickpea Pancakes with Leeks, Squash, and Yogurt

Butternut winter squash

Gluten-free savory pancakes! Courtesy of chickpea flour and winter squash, plus a few other tasty ingredients.

6 tablespoons high-heat oil (safflower, sunflower, or canola), divided
1 medium leek, white and pale-green parts only, chopped
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup grated peeled squash (such as butternut or kabocha)
1 large egg
3/4 cup chickpea flour
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup plain yogurt
1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh parsley
Salt

Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large skillet, preferably nonstick, over medium-high. Add leek, season with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until leek is softened and starting to brown, about 4 minutes. Add squash and season again. Cook, stirring often, until squash is cooked through and softened, about 4 minutes. Transfer vegetables to a plate and let cool. Wipe out skillet and reserve.

Meanwhile, whisk egg, chickpea flour, baking powder, 1 tablespoon oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 cup water in a medium bowl; season with pepper and let sit 5 minutes for flour to hydrate. Stir vegetables into batter just to coat.

Heat 1 1/2 tablespoon oil in reserved skillet over medium-high. Add batter by the quarter-cupful to make 4 pancakes, gently flattening to about 1/4″ thick. Batter should spread easily—if it doesn’t, thin with a little water. Cook until bottoms are lightly browned and bubbles form on top, about 4 minutes. Use a spatula to carefully flip pancakes over and cook until browned and cooked through, about 2 minutes longer.

Transfer to a plate and tent with a sheet of foil to keep warm. Repeat with another 1 1/2 tablespoons oil and remaining batter. Serve pancakes topped with yogurt, parsley, sea salt, and pepper.

Recipe adapted from BonAppetit.com.

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Margie’s Bran Muffins

1 cup Nash’s soft white wheat flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups Nash’s wheat bran
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup molasses or honey
2 large eggs
1 cup nonfat buttermilk (or half-&-half with 1 teaspoon lemon juice)
1 grated carrot, apple, or zucchini

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. In large mixing bowl, sift together flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir in bran with a whisk or long-tined fork.

Beat together brown sugar, molasses, egg and buttermilk. Add the dry ingredients to liquid ones and stir to moisten, about 30 seconds. Fill each cup in a 6-cup greased muffin tin to 3/4 full and place in oven. Bake until toothpick comes out clean, about 35 minutes. Let cool on rack.

We thank Nash’s own Margie for this recipe.

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