Parsnip Cupcakes

Parsnips on a bed of kale

What? Veggies in your desserts? Why yes, and they’re delicious!

1 cup Nash’s soft white flour
1 tsp. ground cardamom
1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/4 tsp. fine salt
3/4 cup packed light-brown sugar
2 large eggs
2/3 cup vegetable oil
1 Tbsp. vanilla extract, divided
2 cups grated parsnip
8 oz. cream cheese, at room temp
1/2 stick unsalted butter, room temp
1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar

Preheat oven to 350°F. Whisk together flour, cardamom, baking powder, and salt. In a large bowl, whisk together brown sugar, eggs, oil, 2 teaspoons vanilla, and parsnip. Stir in flour mixture.

Line 12 standard muffin cups with paper liners. Divide batter among cups. Bake until a toothpick inserted in center of a cake comes out with a few moist crumbs attached, 18-20 minutes. Let cool completely.

In a large bowl, with a mixer, beat cream cheese, butter, confectioners’ sugar, and remaining teaspoon vanilla until combined. Spread frosting onto cooled cupcakes.

We thank MarthaStewart.com for this recipe.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Potatoes Au Gratin with Fennel & Bacon

fennel

What can you do with fennel? Add bacon!

1 lb sliced bacon
5 Tbsp. butter
5 Tbsp. Nash’s soft white flour
3.5 cups milk
½ tsp. white pepper
Salt and black pepper to taste
1 pinch ground nutmeg
2.5 cups shredded Cheddar cheese
2 lb. yellow potatoes, thinly sliced
1 fennel bulb, trimmed and diced
7 leaves fresh basil, or 1 Tbsp. dried

Preheat the oven to 325° F. Fry bacon in a large skillet until browned. Drain on paper towels. Chop or crumble, and set aside.

Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Whisk in the flour until smooth and starting to bubble. Gradually whisk in milk while stirring constantly so that no lumps form. Cook and stir over medium heat until thickened, about 5 minutes. Season with white pepper, salt, pepper and nutmeg. Remove from the heat and stir in the cheese until smooth, adding a handful at a time. Set aside.

Use 1/3 of the potatoes to make a layer in the bottom of a greased 9×13 inch baking dish. Top with 1/3 of the fennel, 1/3 of the bacon and 1/3 of the basil. Pour about 1/3 of the cheese sauce over everything. Repeat layers two more times or until you run out of room. Cover the dish. Bake in the preheated oven for 1 1/2 hours. Remove the cover during the last 30 minutes to allow the top to brown if desired.

We thank AllRecipes.com for this recipe.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Bre’s Basic Scones

Bre is one of the farm’s unofficial Makers of Snacks. She spoils us with tasty treats! In addition to occasionally baking for us, she also works on our Harvest Crew and at farmer’s markets.

Bre has picked up a few baking tips over the years. “Try to have all your ingredients the same temperature before you mix them. Get a good sifter to thoroughly mix your dry ingredients. Keep that journal, because if you make a slight change that works well, you want to remember it!”

2 cups flour (can be different kinds)
2 Tbsp. sugar
2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 cup chilled and cubed butter
3/4 cup buttermilk
1 egg, separated

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Next, prepare your floured surface for shaping the dough.

(Option if you don’t have buttermilk: Prepare “buttermilk” by combining 1 cup milk and 1 tablespoon lemon juice in a bowl. Let stand 5-10 minutes and measure 3/4 cup liquid from the bowl.)

Combine the dry ingredients in a large bowl or a food processor. Either cut in the cold butter with a pastry cutter or pulse in a food processor until a sandy texture is reached. (Larger butter chunks will lead to flakier scones)

Whisk egg yolk and buttermilk together. Then combine with dry ingredients with a wooden spoon until a dough forms. If it feels too wet or sticky add a small handful of flour and mix until just combined. Trust your instinct!

Pour dough onto a floured surface and shape into a 7 inch disc. (Optional: knead in dried fruit, chocolate chips, raisins, nuts, etc.) Then cut into 8 equal wedges.

Place on your baking sheet and brush on reserved egg white. For softer scones, place touching each other in a tight circle. Bake 25-29 minutes or until barely brown on the edges. Place the sheet on a rack to cool for 10 minutes.

Once cooled, feel free to add a powdered sugar drizzle (see below) or top with preserves.

Powdered Sugar Drizzle (Optional)
1 cup powdered sugar
2 Tbsp. water or milk
1 Tbsp. vanilla.

Combine all drizzle ingredients in a small bowl, adjusting quantities to your desired consistency or top with preserves

Bre’s Baking Tips

Breanna (Bre) Krumpe came to work for Nash’s several years ago and has become one of our most valued employees. She works with the harvest and packing crews, and is also a solid marketeer, anchoring our Seattle markets several times a month. In addition to being a talented musician, she enjoys baking and has been experimenting with different types of flour from Nash’s Farm..

She started her baking “career” while working in a corporate office in Portland.She felt that the atmosphere was too sterile and cold, so she boosted morale and built friendlier relations with her co-workers by baking something for each person’s birthday. “I’m good with spices and flavors, and I like to experiment,” Bre says. “I’ve gotten to the point where flavors are usually good, so now I’m playing with textures.”

Once on the farm, Bre realized she had access to lots of different kinds of grains and flours. She began trying the different kinds, keeping a journal of her recipes and how things turned out when she changed one flour for another. “I bake lots of scones because they are pretty easy and the taste of the flour doesn’t have to compete with other flavors, so you can really compare flavors and textures.”

  • Her favorite of Nash’s flours, so far, is the triticale. “I love the nutty flavor for cookies an brownies.”
  • Nash’s soft white wheat flour is more delicate. “It puffs up more, so my scones are more like cake.”
  • The hard red is more grainy and rustic, good for bread. “It’s so ‘alive.’ I use it for sourdough bread, and each loaf is unique.”
  • She’s just started playing with barley flour. “It makes a fluffier scone than triticale, and has an earthier flavor, but it crumbles a little. I may have to add more oil or moisture.”
  • Combining flours makes for even more interesting flavors. “Buckwheat is almost sweet, so I combine buckwheat and triticale for great taste and texture.”

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

About Nash’s Flours

We think it’s pretty neat that we can grow and mill flour here in the Dungeness Valley. Growing many kinds of grains is a strategy that helps us in case one of the varieties doesn’t do well in any given year. For example, if the hard red wheat gets hit by disease, we still have several other wheat varieties to sell.

Nash's flour in two-pound bags

Which Nash’s flours have you tried? Which do you like best for bread, and which for pancakes? Let us know in the comments below!

So what’s the difference between all these flours? Recently crew member and marketeer Bre Krumpe made scones out of each kind of flour for our marketeers to taste test — and here are the results!

Hard Red Wheat Flour

A scone made with Nash's hard red wheat flour

A scone made with Nash’s hard red wheat flour

This is our go-to flour for bread. It is high in protein and high in gluten, so your bread rises well. It gives a hearty flavor and produces a crisp crust and a crumb with desirable irregular holes. As its name suggests, it gives your bread a slight reddish color. It is great for sourdough or yeasted breads, biscuits, pancakes, muffins, cookies, pizza and pie crusts and for thickening stews and gravies.

Soft White Wheat Flour

A scone made with Nash's soft white wheat flour

A scone made with Nash’s soft white wheat flour

This flour is great for pastries and cakes, as well as croissants, pasta, shortbread, biscuits, pizza dough, pie crusts, and thickening stews and gravies. It has a sweet taste, and its protein and gluten content are lower than Hard Red, so your baked goods won’t rise as much.

Triticale

A scone made with Nash's triticale flour

A scone made with Nash’s triticale flour

Pronounced “trit-ah-KAY-lee,” this flour is a quiet superstar. The plant is a cross between wheat and rye, and gives a moist, hearty, nutty flavor with a slightly spongey texture. Most bakers like to mix triticale flour half-and-half with wheat flour for yeasted breads, or use triticale straight-up in non-yeasted baked goods, like scones, muffins, cookies, and pies. We recommend kneading your triticale dough gently (about 3-5 minutes) due to the lower content of its delicate gluten.

Rye Flour

A scone made with Nash's rye flour

A scone made with Nash’s rye flour

When you think of rye, you might imagine a strong caraway taste — but on its own, rye flour tastes just like any other flour, with a tangy, slightly sour flavor that works well in sourdough loaves.

Buckwheat Flour

A scone made with Nash's buckwheat flour

A scone made with Nash’s buckwheat flour

Buckwheat flour is famously used in hearty buckwheat pancakes — and for good reason! That earthy, nutty flavor shines through when you use this flour in other baked goods too. Buckwheat is gluten-free. (We process buckwheat on equipment that also processes wheat, so we can’t claim that our buckwheat flour is 100% gluten-free. However, the gluten content is small enough that most gluten-sensitive people can tolerate our buckwheat flour.)

Barley Flour

A scone made with Nash's barley flour

A scone made with Nash’s barley flour

Here is the newest addition to Nash’s flour line. It is a low-gluten flour with a mild, sweet, nutty flavor. Our barley is a mix of three varieties: one reddish, one yellowish, and one greenish. Bre’s barley scones developed a pretty purplish tint inside!

For the best results with any of these flours, keep it in your freezer in an airtight container, like a plastic bag. This prevents the flour from oxidizing and keeps it fresh.

What have you made out of Nash’s flour? Did you combine multiple flours, or are you a purist? Let us know in the comments below!

 

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Chocolate Chip Barley Flour Cookies

Barley Flour Cookies from Bre

The crew thanks Bre wholeheartedly for this amazing treat!

3/4 room-temperature unsalted butter
1 cup loose brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 room-temperature Nash’s eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 teaspoon salt
3 cups Nash’s barley flour
1 1/2 cups chocolate chips, or to taste

In a stand mixer or a large bowl with beaters, cream butter, brown sugar and sugar thoroughly. Add eggs and vanilla; mix well. Next add baking powder, baking soda and salt. Slowly add in barley flour, scraping the sides of your bowl as needed. Mix in chocolate chips with clean hands and smile! Roll into balls 2 tablespoons at a time and bake at 375 for 12 minutes. Do not overbake!

We thank our own marketeer and field crew member Bre Krumpe for creating this amazing recipe!

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Hush Puppies

Stone-Ground Cornmeal

Our cornmeal is not only grown and milled on the farm, it’s also GMO free!

Pair these with some of Nash’s hearty vegetables for a warm and filling winter meal.

1 cup yellow cornmeal
1/2 cup flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 tablespoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 cup buttermilk
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
1 teaspoon hot sauce
1 (8 1/4-ounce) can cream-style corn
1/2 jalapeño, stemmed, seeded, and roughly chopped
1/2 small red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and roughly chopped
1/2 small yellow onion, roughly chopped
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Vegetable oil, for frying

Whisk cornmeal, flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder in a large bowl. Pulse buttermilk, butter, hot sauce, cream-style corn, jalapeño, red pepper, onion, and black pepper in a food processor until almost smooth. Add buttermilk mixture to dry ingredients and stir together until combined. Cover batter with plastic wrap and refrigerate 10 minutes.

Pour enough oil to reach a depth of 2″ in a 6-quart saucepan. Heat until a deep-fry thermometer reads 350°. Using a 1-ounce scoop, drop 2 tablespoons batter into oil, making sure not to crowd the pan. Cook, flipping once, until golden and cooked through, 2–3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer hush puppies to paper towels to drain; season with salt.

We thank saveur.com for this recipe.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Basic Oat Crumble Topping for Fruit Crisp

Nash's rolled oats

Nash’s naked oats – grown and rolled here on the farm!

This crumble will cover a 9×13 pan of your favorite fruit crisp.

1 1/2 cup rolled oats
1/2 cup flour
1 cup packed light brown sugar
Spices – cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger
Pinch of salt
Nuts (optional)
1 cup (two sticks) unsalted butter

Mix the dry ingredients then cut the butter into pieces and work it into the mixed ingredients with your fingers gently until it resembles coarse crumbs. Work in the nuts, if using. Sprinkle the crumbles on any fruit evenly. Strawberries and apples or pears make a nice combination. Bake at 375 as directed for the pie or crumble you’re making. (Usually bake this topping in the range of 45 minutes.)

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Buckwheat Bliny

Buckwheat groats

Before it’s ground into flour, buckwheat looks like a pile of tiny, three-sided pyramids. After it’s ground, sifted, and baked into pancakes, buckwheat is delicious.

This traditional Russian dish highlights buckwheat’s place of origin (Siberia) and is very versatile. Add your choice of accompaniments and eat these treats for breakfast, lunch, dinner or snacks. Make a batch on Sunday and enjoy throughout the week! If you are trying to reduce the amount of gluten in your diet, use all buckwheat flour instead of the soft white wheat flour.

2/3 cups Nash’s soft white wheat flour
1/2 cup buckwheat flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon instant yeast
1 cup warm milk
2 tablespoons  butter
1 egg, separated
Vegetable oil (high heat)

Optional accompaniments
Butter
Sour cream
Crème fraîche
Caviar
Smoked fish (salmon, sturgeon, trout, whitefish)
Chopped onions
Chopped hard-boiled eggs
Fresh chopped dill
Beet salad

In a bowl, mix the first four dry ingredients together and then make a well in the center. Add the milk and blend well with a wooden spoon. Cover with a dish towel and place in a warm, draft-free area and let the sponge rise until it doubles in size, about a hour.

Melt the butter and let it cool. Break up and beat the egg yolk in a small bowl and add the cooled melted butter a teaspoon at a time (this is an important step to temper the batter) and beat well. Add this egg yolk/butter mixture to the sponge and mix well.

In a separate bowl, whisk the egg white until stiff and fold into the sponge/batter. Cover again and let stand for twenty minutes.

Heat a skillet or griddle to medium heat and coat lightly with vegetable oil. Spoon about 2 tablespoons to a quarter cup of batter on the skillet, depending on how large you want your bliny to be. When the bubbles on the surface of the batter pop (after about a minute or two) turn the bliny over with a spatula and cook for another 45 seconds to a minute. Transfer to a plate and keep warm. Serve with your preferred accompaniments.

We thank thekitchn.com for this recipe.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

Chocolate Beet Cake

A bunch of golden beets8 ounces beets, unpeeled, rinsed and scrubbed free of dirt
7 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped
1/4 cup hot espresso
7 ounces butter at room temperature, cubed
1 cup flour
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
5 large eggs, separated, at room temperature
Pinch salt
1 cup sugar

Grease an 8 1/2 inch pan and line the bottom with parchment paper. Boil the beets in salted water until very tender, about 45 minutes. Drain, then rinse with cold water. When cool enough to handle, slip off the peels, cut into chunks, and grind in a food processor or grate until a coarse puree.

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. In a large bowl, set over a pan of barely simmering water, melt the chocolate, stirring as little as possible. Once melted, turn off the heat, pour in hot espresso and stir once. Press butter pieces into chocolate and allow to soften without stirring.

Sift together flour, cocoa powder, and baking powder in separate bowl. Remove bowl of chocolate from heat and stir until butter is melted. Let sit to cool, then stir egg yolks together and briskly stir them into chocolate mixture. Fold in the beets.

In stand mixer, or by hand, whip egg whites until stiff. Gradually fold sugar into egg whites, then fold into melted chocolate mixture, being careful not to overmix. Fold in the flour and cocoa powder.

Scrape the batter into prepared cake pan and reduce oven heat to 325ºF, and bake for 40 minutes, or until sides are just set but center is still is wobbly. Do not overbake. Let cool completely, then remove from pan.

Spread with crème fraîche and sprinkle with poppy seeds shortly before serving.

We thank davidlebovitz.com for this recipe.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!

About Nash’s Soft White Wheat Flour

white wheat flour

Meet Nash’s soft white wheat flour: grown and milled here on the farm.

What? White flour that is really wheat?

Yes, this can be confusing sometimes, as we have thought about white bread versus wheat bread ever since milling really took off in the United States. We should really talk about these breads as being made with whole grains vs. processed/refined grains, as that refers to the process the grains undergo after they are harvested, and not just the color of the bread. All breads are made from wheat or other variety of grain. The difference is what is left of the seed after it undergoes processing.

When a grain is refined, it is stripped of the germ and bran and only the endosperm (starch) remains. This is great if you want your flour to be able to sit on the shelf for years and not go rancid. However, it removes the most valuable nutrients, such as protective oils, fiber, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and iron. These nutrients help to feed the seed as it germinates and grows. When we “enrich” refined grains, we add these nutrients back in. Why remove them in the first place?

Nash’s soft white wheat flour is a whole grain product, so when we grind the wheat seeds, all parts of the seed including the bran (which contains fiber), the germ (which contains valuable oils and nutrients) and the endosperm are all still there, creating a nourishing end product. At Nash’s, we grow and mill the grains at the farm, delivering a fresh product with a difference you can taste. Our soft white wheat flour is perfect for making pastries, cakes, cookies, cereals, flat breads and crackers.

Our flour is a living product. To maintain its freshness, we recommend storing it in the refrigerator or freezer.

Have you tried this recipe? Tell us how it turned out!