Sid’s Southern Skillet Cornbread

Now’s a great time to get cozy with freshly ground local cornmeal. Nash’s sales manager and miller Sid Maroney is from Tennessee and is quite the cornbread maker. Southern cornbread traditionally doesn’t include wheat flour or sugar, just good, fresh cornmeal. Try this simple recipe to wow and amaze your friends and family with the tastiest cornbread they’ve every had!
skillet cornbread3 cups Nash’s cornmeal
1 tsp kosher salt (1 1/2 if using unsalted butter)
2 tsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
2 1/2 cups buttermilk or milk
3 eggs
1 stick unsalted butter

Place 12-inch cast iron skillet on the center rack of oven and preheat to 375 degrees. In a large bowl, whisk together all dry ingredients. In another bowl, whisk all wet ingredients. Combine wet into dry, mix thoroughly but avoid over-mixing.

Butter up the skillet (careful, it’s hot!) and spread the batter into the pan. Bake until lightly browned and starting to crack. YUM!

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Savoy Cabbage Raab and Pork

A jaunty bunch of savoy cabbage raab

Savoy cabbage raab in its full glory.

3-4 slices bacon or pork belly, cut into small pieces
4 cloves garlic, chopped
2 bunches Savoy cabbage raab, washed and ends trimmed
1 Tbsp. olive oil
1/8 tsp. cayenne (optional)
Whole grains or brown rice (optional)

Saute bacon or pork belly with garlic in a frying pan until the bacon starts to brown. Remove and set aside.

Cut raab (stalk, leaves, florets and all) into one-inch pieces. Add olive oil to the pork drippings and saute raab until it starts to wilt. Cover and let it cook for a few minutes more until tender.

Remove from heat and stir in pork and garlic. Add salt and pepper to taste and a little cayenne if you like a bit of a kick. This tastes great on a bed of brown rice or on cooked whole grain, like triticale or rye berries.

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What is raab? And how do I eat it?

Introducing: raabs!

“I haven’t seen greens at the farmer’s market for weeks — and now suddenly all my favorite farmers are proclaiming the deliciousness of this raab stuff. But what is raab? And how to I eat it?”

First, what are raabs?

Raabs are harbingers of springtime in the Northwest. When the weather starts to warm, plants in the brassica family (which includes kales, cabbages, Brussels sprouts, etc.) send stalks of flowers up to the sky. These structures are called “raabs.”

Why should I love raabs?

Raabs are tender and sweet, because brassica plants produce sugar as anti-freeze during the winter.

Lacinato raab

Raabs are fully edible, flowers and all.

How can I eat raabs?

You can eat raabs raw or cooked, and every part is edible — that includes the stalks, the leaves, and the flowers too! Chop your raabs raw into salads, or lightly steam a handful to let the tender texture and the sweetness shine. Drizzle oil on them and briefly grill or broil them. Use them any way you might use kale or asparagus.

Why should I eat raabs immediately?

Raabs are only around for a short time in the spring. As soon as the raab flowers open, we must disk the plants into the ground so they don’t cross-pollinate with any of our seed crops. Also, we need to prep the soil as soon as we can for the next round of crops.

Raabs can be important to farmers because selling them provides the farm with income in the spring, when we have very little else to sell. At the same time, we have a lot of costs in the spring, as we prep our soil, start seeds, transplant seedlings, and repair broken equipment. We love raabs for many reasons!

Let’s take a look at some examples.

lacinato kale raab

Lacinato kale raab: Kale raabs tend to look like baby versions of their grownup counterparts. In this lacinato kale raab, the little leaves are bumpy and textured like normal lacinato kale. In this bunch, the flower heads are only just starting to emerge.

One bunch of green kale raab, against a background of Nash boxes

Green kale raab: the leaves and flowers are so tender, and the stalks are super-sweet.

red kale raab

Red kale raab: Here’s a raab that will add gorgeous color to a salad or side dish.

red russian kale raab

Red Russian kale raab: This tender kale produces delicate baby leaves with its flowering stalks.

Red cabbage raab

Red cabbage raab: Cabbage raab leaves tend to be rounded and spoon-shaped.

Green cabbage raab

Green cabbage raab: It can be hard to tell green cabbage raab apart from collard raab and Brussels sprout raab, but they’re all worth trying!

A jaunty bunch of savoy cabbage raab

Savoy cabbage raab: Its little round leaves look a bit like small collard leaves with a lacinato-like texture.

Collard raab

Collard raab: If the leaves on your collard raab are large enough, they start to look like their grown-up versions, just smaller.

rutabaga raab

Rutabaga raab can be a little spicy when eaten raw, just like arugula raab — which are both excellent when chopped into salads.

Enjoy all the varieties of raabs before they’re gone!

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Kale Flowers with Lemon and Butter

Lacinato raab

It’s spring, it’s finally spring, and the kale is abloom!

1/2 pound kale flowers, stems and leaflets
1 Tbsp. (or so) of butter
Juice from half a lemon
Splash of white wine or sherry
Pinch of salt

Heat a large sauté pan over medium-high heat, and melt the butter (not oil, please). Once the butter is melted, give the cleaned and prepped kale (flowers, stems and leaflets) one last rinse. Then, add the whole lot (still wet) to the pan. The kale should be moist enough for the sauté, but don’t hesitate to add a splash of water or chicken broth if the pan starts to dry.

Sauté over medium-high heat for a few minutes, until the leaves wilt and the stems are fork tender.

Add the lemon juice and a splash of wine (not too much — a tablespoon or two is probably perfect), sauté the kale for a moment longer, and then serve it while still hot.

That’s it! Very very simple, and extremely tasty. After all, it’s lemon, butter and wine. What’s not to like!

Recipe adapted from outlawgarden.com

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Rutabaga Borscht

Rutabagas in a basket

What to do with a basket full of rutabagas?

2 Tbsp oil or butter
1 1/2 chopped onion
1 1/2 cups chopped potatoes
1 or more cup chopped beets
1 large carrot sliced
1 stalk of celery sliced
3 cups chopped rutabaga
1 cup tomato, diced or puréed
1 tsp caraway seed
4 cups stock (veggie or chicken)
2 tsp salt
Black pepper to taste
1/4 tsp dill weed
2 Tbsp cider vinegar
1 1/2 Tbsp honey

Sautee onions in oil or butter. Add caraway and salt.  When soft add the other veggies, stock/water and remaining ingredients.  Simmer until tender for at least 30 minutes. Whiz in the blender until smooth.  Serve with sour cream or yogurt dollop on top.

We thank Pam & Liam Antrim for this recipe.

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About Nash’s Flours

We think it’s pretty neat that we can grow and mill flour here in the Dungeness Valley. Growing many kinds of grains is a strategy that helps us in case one of the varieties doesn’t do well in any given year. For example, if the hard red wheat gets hit by disease, we still have several other wheat varieties to sell.

Nash's flour in two-pound bags

Which Nash’s flours have you tried? Which do you like best for bread, and which for pancakes? Let us know in the comments below!

So what’s the difference between all these flours? Recently crew member and marketeer Bre Krumpe made scones out of each kind of flour for our marketeers to taste test — and here are the results!

Hard Red Wheat Flour

A scone made with Nash's hard red wheat flour

A scone made with Nash’s hard red wheat flour

This is our go-to flour for bread. It is high in protein and high in gluten, so your bread rises well. It gives a hearty flavor and produces a crisp crust and a crumb with desirable irregular holes. As its name suggests, it gives your bread a slight reddish color. It is great for sourdough or yeasted breads, biscuits, pancakes, muffins, cookies, pizza and pie crusts and for thickening stews and gravies.

Soft White Wheat Flour

A scone made with Nash's soft white wheat flour

A scone made with Nash’s soft white wheat flour

This flour is great for pastries and cakes, as well as croissants, pasta, shortbread, biscuits, pizza dough, pie crusts, and thickening stews and gravies. It has a sweet taste, and its protein and gluten content are lower than Hard Red, so your baked goods won’t rise as much.

Triticale

A scone made with Nash's triticale flour

A scone made with Nash’s triticale flour

Pronounced “trit-ah-KAY-lee,” this flour is a quiet superstar. The plant is a cross between wheat and rye, and gives a moist, hearty, nutty flavor with a slightly spongey texture. Most bakers like to mix triticale flour half-and-half with wheat flour for yeasted breads, or use triticale straight-up in non-yeasted baked goods, like scones, muffins, cookies, and pies. We recommend kneading your triticale dough gently (about 3-5 minutes) due to the lower content of its delicate gluten.

Rye Flour

A scone made with Nash's rye flour

A scone made with Nash’s rye flour

When you think of rye, you might imagine a strong caraway taste — but on its own, rye flour tastes just like any other flour, with a tangy, slightly sour flavor that works well in sourdough loaves.

Buckwheat Flour

A scone made with Nash's buckwheat flour

A scone made with Nash’s buckwheat flour

Buckwheat flour is famously used in hearty buckwheat pancakes — and for good reason! That earthy, nutty flavor shines through when you use this flour in other baked goods too. Buckwheat is gluten-free. (We process buckwheat on equipment that also processes wheat, so we can’t claim that our buckwheat flour is 100% gluten-free. However, the gluten content is small enough that most gluten-sensitive people can tolerate our buckwheat flour.)

Barley Flour

A scone made with Nash's barley flour

A scone made with Nash’s barley flour

Here is the newest addition to Nash’s flour line. It is a low-gluten flour with a mild, sweet, nutty flavor. Our barley is a mix of three varieties: one reddish, one yellowish, and one greenish. Bre’s barley scones developed a pretty purplish tint inside!

For the best results with any of these flours, keep it in your freezer in an airtight container, like a plastic bag. This prevents the flour from oxidizing and keeps it fresh.

What have you made out of Nash’s flour? Did you combine multiple flours, or are you a purist? Let us know in the comments below!

 

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Garlicky Spinach Salad with Pine Nuts and Raisins

Spinach in the field

It’s finally SPINACH time again! Hooray!

1 bunch Nash’s spinach, rinsed and drained
1/3 cup pine nuts
3 cloves garlic
1/2 anchovy filet (about 1/4 cup anchovy paste)
Pinch of salt, pepper, red pepper flakes
1 Tbsp. + 1 tsp. vinegar or lemon juice
1/4 cup oil
3 Tbsp. vinegar
1/3 cup raisins

In a small skillet over medium heat, toast pine nuts, shaking pan and stirring often, until they are barely golden and fragrant, about 3 minutes. Pour onto a plate to cool.

Using a mortar and pestle, mash garlic, anchovy, a pinch of salt and red pepper flakes into a paste. Transfer to a small bowl. Whisk in vinegar, then slowly whisk in oil.

Chiffonade the spinach by stacking the leaves, rolling them tightly, and slicing them perpendicular to the roll. This gives long, thin strips of spinach.

Place spinach in a large bowl; add vinaigrette until just covered and toss well to combine. Add pine nuts and raisins. Toss once more and serve. 2 to 4 servings.

Recipe adapted from nytimes.com.

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Brussels Sprout Slaw with Apples and Pecans

Brussels Sprouts close-up

Brussels sprouts don’t only look like tiny cabbages — they can be used in many of the same ways as cabbages. Try Brussels slaw!

1 pound trimmed Brussels sprouts
6 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp. lemon zest
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper
1 diced Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apple
2 oz. shredded Parmesan cheese
1/3 cup toasted and chopped pecans
1 Tbsp. honey
1 tsp. kosher salt
1/2 tsp. black pepper

Thinly slice Brussels sprouts using a mandolin or food processor fitted with the slicer attachment. Transfer sprouts to a large bowl. Add olive oil, lemon zest, lemon juice, and red pepper. Toss to coat. Add apple, Parmesan cheese, pecans, honey, salt, and pepper. Toss to coat. Let stand 5 minutes to allow the Brussels sprouts to wilt slightly and the flavors to marry.

We thank southernliving.com for this recipe.

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Sweet Barley Pilaf

Barley growing in the field

We got quite a treat this week: Isabelle from the Sequim Food Bank tried out this recipe using Nash’s barley and shared some with us. It’s totally tasty!

Serves 6.

1 Tbsp. olive oil
1 medium onion, diced (2 cups)
4 mushrooms, sliced (1 cup)
1 celery stalk, diced
1/2 cup slivered almonds (or other nuts)
1 cup barley or other whole grain
1/4 cup raisins, golden or black
Dash of salt
1 Tbsp. each fresh rosemary and marjoram, minced, or 1/2 tsp. dried
2 1/2 cups chicken or vegetable broth, low-sodium

In large saucepan, heat olive oil and saute onion until translucent. Add mushrooms, celery and almonds. Cook 3-5 minutes.

Stir in barley, raisins and seasonings until barley is coated with other ingredients.

Add broth and bring to a boil for 2 minutes, cover and reduce heat to simmer for 55 minutes.

We thank Well-Fed Me for this recipe, and also Isabelle from the Sequim Food Bank for calling our attention to this delicious recipe.

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Creamy, Smoky Whipped Rutabaga

Rutabagas in a basket

Does anyone else love rutabagas even more than potatoes?

3 1/2 to 4 pounds rutabagas (two small or one large vegetable)
2 Tbsp. unsalted butter
4 garlic cloves, peeled and roughly chopped
1 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
1 cup whole milk
4 ounces cream cheese, cut into small chunks
2 Tbsp. olive oil
2 tsp. smoked paprika
Freshly ground black pepper

Using a veggie peeler, remove the skin from the rutabaga(s). Then cut them into small slices about 1 inch thick.

Heat the butter in a large, heavy 4-quart pot, set over medium heat. When the butter has melted, stir in the chopped rutabaga and the garlic. Stir to coat the vegetables in butter, then sprinkle them with the salt. Pour in the milk and bring to a simmer, then turn the heat to low and cover the pot. Cook for 30 minutes, or until the rutabaga is very tender and can be easily pierced with a fork. Turn off the heat and remove the lid. Let the vegetables cool for about 5 minutes.

At this point you can either leave the rutabaga in the pot and use a hand mixer to whip it, or you can transfer it to the bowl of a stand mixer and use the paddle.

Drop the cream cheese into the rutabaga and use the hand mixer or stand mixer to mash it into the vegetables. The rutabaga will crumble then slowly turn into a mashed potato consistency. Add the olive oil and smoked paprika and mix thoroughly. Taste and add more salt and some black pepper, if necessary. Serve immediately.

Recipe adapted from thekitchn.com.

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