Creamy Camelina Dill Dressing

NEW at Nash’s! Eating local has never been so easy when you can get local cooking oil!

1/3 cup Greek yogurt (optional)
2 small garlic cloves
2 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
2 Tbsp. cider vinegar
1 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
1/3 cup Nash’s camelina oil
1 cup fresh chopped dill
Salt and pepper, to taste

In food processor, combine yogurt (if using), garlic, mustard, vinegar, and lime juice. Process until smooth and slowly add camelina oil to ensure emulsification.

Once all the camelina oil has been added, process for an additional minute, transfer to bowl, and fold in dill. Season with salt and pepper. If you wish to cut out yogurt for more of a vinaigrette texture, just whisk all ingredients together in bowl.

This dressing will keep for several days in fridge—just shake or whisk before use.

Makes 1 cup.

Serve drizzled over fresh greens and summer veggies, or get creative—this dressing can also be used for fish, pasta salad, slaws, potatoes, and dips.

We thank Alive.com for this recipe.

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Roasted Spring Radishes and Asparagus Salad

DID YOU KNOW? Asparagus is one of nature’s best cancer-prevention veggies — and they’re so tasty, too!

Serves two

1 cup halved radishes
2 cups asparagus, chopped into thirds
1 Tbsp. olive oil

Green Onion Vinaigrette
2 Tbsp. olive oil (or Nash’s camelina oil)
3 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar
2 green onion
1 Tbsp. chives
1 Tbsp. sugar or honey
Zest and juice from 1/2 lemon

Preheat oven to 400˚. Toss radish and asparagus in olive oil. Spread out in a single layer on a cookie sheet. Bake for 15-20 minutes until radish and asparagus is tender.

Meanwhile, combine vinaigrette ingredients into a food processor or blender. Mix until well combined and green onion is in small pieces. Once asparagus and radishes are done, toss in vinaigrette.

Serve as a side dish or atop a bed of arugula or other salad greens.

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Braised Spring Carrots and Leeks with Tarragon

Bunch carrots

They’re BACK! Bunched carrots are coming out of the greenhouse and into your tummy!

2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1 lb. leeks, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise, cleaned and sliced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 lb. carrots, peeled, halved or quartered lengthwise if thick, then cut in 2-inch lengths
½ cup water
Salt to taste
2 tsp. fresh lemon juice
1 Tbsp. chopped fresh tarragon

Heat olive oil in a medium saucepan or lidded skillet over medium heat. Add leeks and a generous pinch of salt. Cook gently until just about tender, about three minutes. Do not allow leeks to color. Add garlic, and cook, stirring, until fragrant, 30 seconds to a minute. Add carrots, water and salt to taste, and lower heat. Cover and simmer 10 to 15 minutes until carrots are tender when pierced with a knife. Stir in lemon juice and tarragon. Taste and adjust salt. Serve hot, or at room temperature. Sprinkle with additional fresh tarragon just before serving.

We thank cooking.nytimes.com for this recipe.

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Balsamic and Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower

Cauliflower in the field8 cups 1-inch-thick slices cauliflower florets (about 1 large head)
2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
1 tsp. dried marjoram
1/4 tsp. salt
Freshly ground pepper to taste
2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar
1/2 cup finely shredded Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 450°F.

To prepare florets from a whole head of cauliflower, remove outer leaves. Slice off the thick stem. With the head upside down and holding a knife at a 45° angle, slice into the smaller stems with a circular motion—removing a “plug” from the center of the head. Break or cut florets until you have 8 cups.

Toss cauliflower, oil, marjoram, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Spread on a large rimmed baking sheet and roast until starting to soften and brown on the bottom, 15 to 20 minutes. Toss the cauliflower with vinegar and sprinkle with cheese. Return to the oven and roast until the cheese is melted and any moisture has evaporated, 5 to 10 minutes more.

We thank eatingwell.com for this recipe.

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Sid’s Southern Skillet Cornbread

Now’s a great time to get cozy with freshly ground local cornmeal. Nash’s sales manager and miller Sid Maroney is from Tennessee and is quite the cornbread maker. Southern cornbread traditionally doesn’t include wheat flour or sugar, just good, fresh cornmeal. Try this simple recipe to wow and amaze your friends and family with the tastiest cornbread they’ve every had!
skillet cornbread3 cups Nash’s cornmeal
1 tsp kosher salt (1 1/2 if using unsalted butter)
2 tsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
2 1/2 cups buttermilk or milk
3 eggs
1 stick unsalted butter

Place 12-inch cast iron skillet on the center rack of oven and preheat to 375 degrees. In a large bowl, whisk together all dry ingredients. In another bowl, whisk all wet ingredients. Combine wet into dry, mix thoroughly but avoid over-mixing.

Butter up the skillet (careful, it’s hot!) and spread the batter into the pan. Bake until lightly browned and starting to crack. YUM!

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Savoy Cabbage Raab and Pork

A jaunty bunch of savoy cabbage raab

Savoy cabbage raab in its full glory.

3-4 slices bacon or pork belly, cut into small pieces
4 cloves garlic, chopped
2 bunches Savoy cabbage raab, washed and ends trimmed
1 Tbsp. olive oil
1/8 tsp. cayenne (optional)
Whole grains or brown rice (optional)

Saute bacon or pork belly with garlic in a frying pan until the bacon starts to brown. Remove and set aside.

Cut raab (stalk, leaves, florets and all) into one-inch pieces. Add olive oil to the pork drippings and saute raab until it starts to wilt. Cover and let it cook for a few minutes more until tender.

Remove from heat and stir in pork and garlic. Add salt and pepper to taste and a little cayenne if you like a bit of a kick. This tastes great on a bed of brown rice or on cooked whole grain, like triticale or rye berries.

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Kale Flowers with Lemon and Butter

Lacinato raab

It’s spring, it’s finally spring, and the kale is abloom!

1/2 pound kale flowers, stems and leaflets
1 Tbsp. (or so) of butter
Juice from half a lemon
Splash of white wine or sherry
Pinch of salt

Heat a large sauté pan over medium-high heat, and melt the butter (not oil, please). Once the butter is melted, give the cleaned and prepped kale (flowers, stems and leaflets) one last rinse. Then, add the whole lot (still wet) to the pan. The kale should be moist enough for the sauté, but don’t hesitate to add a splash of water or chicken broth if the pan starts to dry.

Sauté over medium-high heat for a few minutes, until the leaves wilt and the stems are fork tender.

Add the lemon juice and a splash of wine (not too much — a tablespoon or two is probably perfect), sauté the kale for a moment longer, and then serve it while still hot.

That’s it! Very very simple, and extremely tasty. After all, it’s lemon, butter and wine. What’s not to like!

Recipe adapted from outlawgarden.com

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Rutabaga Borscht

Rutabagas in a basket

What to do with a basket full of rutabagas?

2 Tbsp oil or butter
1 1/2 chopped onion
1 1/2 cups chopped potatoes
1 or more cup chopped beets
1 large carrot sliced
1 stalk of celery sliced
3 cups chopped rutabaga
1 cup tomato, diced or puréed
1 tsp caraway seed
4 cups stock (veggie or chicken)
2 tsp salt
Black pepper to taste
1/4 tsp dill weed
2 Tbsp cider vinegar
1 1/2 Tbsp honey

Sautee onions in oil or butter. Add caraway and salt.  When soft add the other veggies, stock/water and remaining ingredients.  Simmer until tender for at least 30 minutes. Whiz in the blender until smooth.  Serve with sour cream or yogurt dollop on top.

We thank Pam & Liam Antrim for this recipe.

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Brussels Sprout Slaw with Apples and Pecans

Brussels Sprouts close-up

Brussels sprouts don’t only look like tiny cabbages — they can be used in many of the same ways as cabbages. Try Brussels slaw!

1 pound trimmed Brussels sprouts
6 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp. lemon zest
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper
1 diced Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apple
2 oz. shredded Parmesan cheese
1/3 cup toasted and chopped pecans
1 Tbsp. honey
1 tsp. kosher salt
1/2 tsp. black pepper

Thinly slice Brussels sprouts using a mandolin or food processor fitted with the slicer attachment. Transfer sprouts to a large bowl. Add olive oil, lemon zest, lemon juice, and red pepper. Toss to coat. Add apple, Parmesan cheese, pecans, honey, salt, and pepper. Toss to coat. Let stand 5 minutes to allow the Brussels sprouts to wilt slightly and the flavors to marry.

We thank southernliving.com for this recipe.

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Creamy, Smoky Whipped Rutabaga

Rutabagas in a basket

Does anyone else love rutabagas even more than potatoes?

3 1/2 to 4 pounds rutabagas (two small or one large vegetable)
2 Tbsp. unsalted butter
4 garlic cloves, peeled and roughly chopped
1 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
1 cup whole milk
4 ounces cream cheese, cut into small chunks
2 Tbsp. olive oil
2 tsp. smoked paprika
Freshly ground black pepper

Using a veggie peeler, remove the skin from the rutabaga(s). Then cut them into small slices about 1 inch thick.

Heat the butter in a large, heavy 4-quart pot, set over medium heat. When the butter has melted, stir in the chopped rutabaga and the garlic. Stir to coat the vegetables in butter, then sprinkle them with the salt. Pour in the milk and bring to a simmer, then turn the heat to low and cover the pot. Cook for 30 minutes, or until the rutabaga is very tender and can be easily pierced with a fork. Turn off the heat and remove the lid. Let the vegetables cool for about 5 minutes.

At this point you can either leave the rutabaga in the pot and use a hand mixer to whip it, or you can transfer it to the bowl of a stand mixer and use the paddle.

Drop the cream cheese into the rutabaga and use the hand mixer or stand mixer to mash it into the vegetables. The rutabaga will crumble then slowly turn into a mashed potato consistency. Add the olive oil and smoked paprika and mix thoroughly. Taste and add more salt and some black pepper, if necessary. Serve immediately.

Recipe adapted from thekitchn.com.

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